Download Class Struggle or Family Struggle?: The Lives of Women by Seung-kyung Kim PDF

By Seung-kyung Kim

This learn considers South Korean financial improvement from the point of view of younger woman manufacturing facility staff, who grapple with defining their roles in appreciate to marriage and motherhood. Kim explores the women's person and collective struggles to enhance their positions and examines their hyperlinks with different political forces in the hard work stream. She analyzes how woman employees envision their position in society, how they do something about fiscal and social marginalization of their day-by-day lives, and the way they improve techniques for a greater destiny.

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Extra info for Class Struggle or Family Struggle?: The Lives of Women Factory Workers in South Korea

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G. Dublin 1981; Hareven and Langenbach 1978; Hershatter 1986; Honig 1986; KesslerHarris 1981,1982; Lown 1990; Norwood 1990; Tilly and Scott 1987; Tsurumi 1990) have described the mix of exploitation and opportunity that factory work provided for women as they came to participate in paid industrial labor. Freed from the strict labor legislation of their home countries, the multinational corporations have re-created industrial conditions similar to, or perhaps worse than, those found in the workshops of Europe and America more than a hundred years ago (Rosen 1987:22).

Productivity and control were the dominant themes that emerged from my research. With sixty-hour workweeks common, workers' daily lives were completely dominated by the factory experience. For most women, however, factory work was a means to an end. Their belief that they were temporary workers was both a source of emotional strength, because they could envision a better life in the not-too-distant future, and a source of political weakness, because they did not expect to be in the factories long enough to benefit from improvements promoted by unions.

The tax benefits included an exemption from all income taxes for the first five years and taxation at half the usual rate for the following three years; a total exemption from the business tax; an exemption from acquisition taxes for the first five years and taxation at half the usual rate for the following three years; and a total exemption from all individual income taxes. One of the incentives that the South Korean government offered foreign investors was a hard-working and compliant labor force.

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