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By G. R. Berridge

Like all professions, international relations has spawned its personal really expert terminology, and it really is this lexicon which supplies A Dictionary of international relations 's thematic backbone. notwithstanding, the dictionary additionally contains entries on felony phrases, political occasions, foreign organisations and significant figures who've occupied the diplomatic scene or have written influentially approximately it over the past part millennium. All scholars of international relations and comparable topics and particularly junior individuals of the numerous diplomatic companies of the area will locate this booklet indispensable.

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A Dictionary of Diplomacy

Like several professions, international relations has spawned its personal really good terminology, and it really is this lexicon which supplies A Dictionary of international relations 's thematic backbone. notwithstanding, the dictionary additionally comprises entries on felony phrases, political occasions, overseas businesses and significant figures who've occupied the diplomatic scene or have written influentially approximately it over the past part millennium.

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See also Torcy. calls (on appointment to new post). See courtesy calls. Cambon, Jules (1845–1935). A French colonial governor and diplomat. Younger brother of Paul *Cambon, Jules was governorgeneral of Algeria (1891–97), and then ambassador at three important embassies. He was then *secretarygeneral of the *Quai d’Orsay, a delegate to the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, and chairman of the extremely important standing Ambassadors’ Conference created in January 1920 to arrange for the execution of certain aspects of the peace treaties.

This established his diplomatic reputation and laid the foundation of the immense influence that he was to acquire in Istanbul when he returned there later in his career. He was minister to Switzerland from 1814 until 1818 and attended the *Congress of Vienna to represent the British position on Swiss affairs. He served as minister to the USA from 1820 until 1824 and afterwards went on a special mission to Russia. In 1825 he was sent once more to Turkey, now with the rank of ambassador, and remained there until the end of 1827.

34 Central Intelligence Agency Central Intelligence Agency. See CIA. chancelier. Earlier known as a cancellier, an administrator or clerk in a diplomatic mission trusted with the keeping and handling of confidential documents. Conceived as the institutional memory, such persons have generally been expected to have an easy familiarity with local languages and customs and be a permanent fixture in their embassy. Sometimes but by no means frequently they are members of the *diplomatic staff. Most diplomatic services now employ such people, whether they go by this name (as in the French Diplomatic Service) or not, but their introduction was fiercely resisted by the British Diplomatic Service in the second half of the nineteenth century on the grounds that the lower social class origins of such people made them in fact untrustworthy.

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